The Last Post (but not quite ours)

When we left home 11 months ago we said our destination was Belgium and we would take the longest route we could to get there. Just over 11 1/2 months, 17000 miles and 600 gallons of diesel later – we have arrived :).

belgium border

Belgium held out on us slightly on the weather front as 10 miles over the border we hit pea soup fog.  We agreed it was pointless to carry on driving as we weren’t seeing anything. I had noted down details of a little camperstop outside a castle, sounded like the best plan to sit out and wait for the sunshine to come back (misplaced optimism there!)

We arrived at Wegimont Chateau and it wasn’t quite as expected,  eight spots for motorhomes but also about 200 permanent pitches where the owners stretch out to the limits of their space, a bit like a canvas city.  Showers were only allowed at set times and bingo took place each afternoon in the community tent – not somewhere we were going to be staying too long at all!

IMG_1660

Wegimont Chateau

On the upside there was a castle on the site – or Chateau –  a Louis XIV style building that was the only Lebensborn maternity home in Belgium. During WWII, these homes were state approved associations with the goal of raising the birth rate of Aryan children via extramarital relations of German men classed as racially pure and healthy with unmarried women. Known locally as an ‘Ayran Stud Farms’, the resultant children were then adopted by likewise “racially pure and healthy” parents, particularly SS members and their families.

A cold, wet and dull day we walked around the park – full winter gear out of the cupboards including gloves for the first time in nearly a year, we managed a full sweep of the arboretum and then a quick hike around town to stock up on a few bits then back to the van for a warm up. Each time it gets a bit colder I have used this as evidence to convince Iain we should head for Portugal for some winter sun – alas so far he is holding out for heading home.

IMG_1655

We had planned for a few days around the Liege area, however waking to sleet on Wednesday scuppered that one. Instead we aimed West and left the sleet behind, instead we hit snow! Proper white flakes of the stuff, falling fairly rapidly but luckily not sticking enough to make driving a problem.

By the time we had arrived in Tournai all signs of snow had gone, replaced with rain and a promise of sunshine later.  Tournai is the oldest town in Belgium, we had never heard of it, not sure why as its very impressive. One of Belgium’s most culturally import towns, it is chock full of magnificent buildings, including the oldest cathedral in Belgium.

As is usual for us the cathedral was shrouded in scaffolding undergoing restoration. The ‘Grand Place’ town square is a mix of trendy shops, bars and several museums set around cobbled streets with a series of water fountains – all in all a great place to spend an afternoon – unless its freezing and damp which it was so we made do with a couple of hours whistle stop tour.

DSCN0416

TournaiDSCN0401

As we  started off last November with a visit to the Etaples military cemetery in France so decided our penultimate stop off point would be Ypres. I have never been before, for whatever reason I thought it was a village with the famous Menin Gate.

Somewhat surprised then to find a fairly substantial city, rebuilt post WWII with German reparation money. The main buildings in the city centre have been reconstructed as close to the original as possible, it is nearly impossible to believe these building were raised to the ground so recently.  The Cloth Hall was one of the largest commercial buildings of the Middle Ages in Europe,  the new structure is the exact copy of the original medieval building.

Ypres (30)

the Cloth Hall

Ypres (23)

the best roof ever – anywhere

The main reason for visiting Ypres, for us as for many others, was to see the Menin Gate Memorial for the Missing. Over 54,000 Commonwealth soldiers from WWI that have no final resting place are commemorated here (with a further 35,000 names that wouldn’t fit on this memorial inscribed at the nearby Tyne Cot memorial).  We were told by a lady from the British Legion in town to be at the gate just after 7pm, even though the service is at 8pm.

We were amazed, when we arrived there were close on 1,000 people, and we were told this is the same every night of the week, every week of the year since 1928 (with a short break during WWII when Ypres was occupied). We stood with a group of Blackwatch Cadets who had travelled there for the weekend, the next night they were forming a guard of honour (the youngsters had all funded their own trips in order to stand for 10 minutes in honour of the dead).

When the three buglers from the local fire brigade sounded the Last Post, it was one of the most simple and moving events either of us have had the honour to attend.

menin (3)

The Menin Gate

Advertisements

16 thoughts on “The Last Post (but not quite ours)

  1. Very impressive! Must put it on my ‘to visit’ list. We went to Belgium 2 years ago, but were unlucky with the stopping places we’d chosen (one campsite had been shut for major refurbishment and the motorhome aire had been taken over by picnickers), so we had to head back to France!

    Like

  2. The WWI history rightly dominates Ypres and, once visited, is never forgotten. But I also find it a thoroughly attractive town to visit – in the summer the central square is crowded and loads of restaurants are everywhere. It’s a sort of small Bruges without the designer shops – which appeals to me no end!! Can’t believe you are nearing or at the end of your trip. Bet you plan another one!! There’s you in Belgium and me at the motorhome show at the NEC; think you win that one!!

    Like

    • Agree totally, we were saying today would happily visit the town for a weekend break just to enjoy the town itself. Ah yes planning, its starting 🙂 we just have to agree on turning left or right – and the small matter of saving up for a year ! 🙂

      Like

  3. > Showers were only allowed at set times and bingo took place each afternoon in the community tent – not somewhere we were going to be staying too long at all!<

    Truly a nostalgia trip! Sounds like Blackpool in the 50s 😀

    Like

  4. Lovely place to visit, Ypres and its surroundings! Safe travels!

    Like

    • I know, will rely on your sunshine tales until we can re-commence travel 🙂 You must be down to single figures on the countdown now ?

      Like

    • Think that is one of the main things we have learned, there are amazing things to see everywhere if you look for them. Belgium is a beautiful country, we will be back.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. We have been and it truly is one of the most moving things we have ever done. It still brought tears to my eyes reading your visit. Wish we still lived in Ruthin would have loved to have spoken to you about your year long experience .

    Like

    • hopefully catch up one day, but be warned we will be sticking to our motto of travel often just broadening the mind but also lengthening the conversation 🙂

      Like

Please feel free to leave a reply :)

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s